Treats of Tel Aviv




The number of super fit and beautiful people running past us on the bustling beach promenade was incredible. And not only at noon or at 3 o’ clock pm but also as we were returning from dinner at eleven o’ clock in the evening. Saying that Tel Aviv is a sporty city is an apt description. Also, you’ll have no trouble finding an outdoor gym as there are numerous of them sprinkled along the beach strip. And if you take a look towards the sea, past the teens playing beach volley (in December!), you’ll see a class of young surf school participants practising the basics of surfing in the water.

Though not everyone was doing the muscle work themselves: I’ve never seen that many electric scooters anywhere else. But still, Tel Aviv exercises around the clock and the atmosphere does wonders to spark one’s exercising motivation.


We spent our Christmas holiday this year in Tel Aviv. Strong recommendations to the city, I really liked it. 19 degrees Celsius during the day, a long beach promenade along the Mediterranean coastline, the sunrays caressing our cheeks, the savory treats of the Middle East cuisine, the busy Carmel market with its rich sweet pastries, the laid-back atmosphere and the gorgeous sunsets with twenty shades of orange: everything really that I had wished from our compact Xmas holiday.

Every city has its own sounds and the soundscape of TLV includes the rhythmic hits echoing from the Matkot beach padel game, the calls to worship from the mosques, the sounds of traffic, the rhythms coming from the lively beach bars and restaurants and the unique Hebrew language.



It is impossible to talk about Tel Aviv without writing about the food and the culinary joys. Try the full-bodied hummus, the luscious falafels, the fresh white fish, the delicious olives and the Flam Blanc white wine. We had a tasty Christmas Eve dinner at Beit Kandinof in Jaffa (Rehov Hatzorfim 14): it is an atmospheric and relaxed place and an art space with a lively bustle, good vibes, cocktails with local spice and such good food. I recommend that you also visit the bohemian district of Neve Tzedek and there the restaurant Dallal (Rehov Shabazi 10): it is romantic, cosy, beautifully lit with light twines and their kitchen combines Middle Eastern and European flavours. One treat that we’ll need to try on our next visit is shakshuka, the superstar of the Israeli breakfast: North-African styled poaches eggs in a spicy tomato sauce.


One thing I want to mention is that I felt very safe during our whole trip. There are tensions in Israel, but you can’t sense or see them in Tel Aviv. Though it was a bit strange to see a handgun tucked in the belt of a man fishing next to us in his civilian clothes. Not necessarily threatening but strange. In the airport it’s good to reserve some extra time for the security checks.

What else what else? Tel Aviv is a city with 15 kilometres of shimmering coastline. It is a culinary hotspot, bustling and vibrant. The White City area with its Bauhaus architecture is worth a visit and near it are many alluring boutiques. The price level in TLV is high, but luckily gazing at the stunning sunset and its mind-blowing tones by the beach is completely free.



Have You Heard of a Pearl Called Pallanza?




I hadn’t, not before last summer. We we’re wondering what to pair with the hiking trip to Matterhorn in Switzerland: key words for the search were Italian lakes, Italian food, sunshine and beautiful views. And, after some google maps and image browsing, Pallanza popped up! And what a delicious and pleasant little pearl by Lake Maggiore it turned out to be.

What made me fall for Pallanza? First, the extra wide jogging and cycling road, which follows the waterfront and leads to the next district, Verbania Intra. There was such proper road width reserved for the runners, so delightful! The morning run from Pallanza to Intra and back with a stop for some stretching, (catching one’s breath) and a water break took around 50 minutes. Our plan on the first morning was to enjoy espressos after the energizing run on the terrace of the café right next to our hotel, but this proved to be a utopian idea since we were sweating like two little piglets and the salt was stinging our eyes. But, anyhow, it was a good workout in a pretty setting.


What I also didn’t know beforehand was that Pallanza is quite the culinary hotspot. The stylish aperitivo in the lakeside garden of Ristorante Milano, the superb and nocturnal Spaghetti allo Scoglio (spaghetti with seafood) of La Tentazione by the market square (nocturnal because we are quite late eaters and their kitchen was open a bit past 9:30 pm), the rich ravioli of Ristorante Il Portale… Il Burchiello was also delicious but during the holiday season remember to book in advance.


And what would be sweeter for an Italian food lover than an Italian food festival taking place right outside our doorstep by the lake. It was sotto le stelle, a dinner and a gastronomic taste journey under the stars. You could buy the tickets either at the entrance or beforehand in the local restaurants. The long tables were covered with white tablecloths and flower compositions and there were candles placed in white paper bags waiting to be lit up after sunset. We got a stamp card with which we could get an apertitif, 5 different small dishes, two glasses of wine and a desert from the different stands of the local restaurants. A local elderly lady who apparently knew everyone in town was kindly pointing us towards the wine and food stands to ensure that we got the hang of it. The evening was tasty and bustling and a good gastronomic dive to the offerings of the district.



Pallanza has its own ferry stop and after some running and culinary delights I recommend you take a lake cruise to the islands (Isola Bella being the botanical crown jewel) and to the city of Stresa: a stroll by the beach promenade, marvelling at the extravagant luxury hotels, a cone of creamy pistachio ice cream, doing some bric-a-brac discoveries in the shops of the old town and sipping a strong espresso on the terrace before heading back to the boat, the components of a happy day trip.



I Amsterdam


I think it was in March when I said Darling, I signed up for the Amsterdam Marathon.

Exactly two weeks ago, on a sunny Sunday on October 15th was the day of the big race. The day when all those countless training hours and certain moments of positive stress were measured.

But, this is not a marathon report, though I might write one next. This is my compact tip guide to Amsterdam. So, hop onboard and let the canal tour begin.

There are cities I like (Reykjavik for example), cities I love for their intense beat (New York, Tokyo, Hong Kong) and cities where I can picture myself living one day (Berlin, Copenhagen and, as the latest discovery: Amsterdam). The atmospheric waterways, numerous flower shops and flower markets, the leaning old narrow buildings, broad biking lanes and the fact that everyone bikes everywhere. Amsterdam is a verdant city which exudes art and interesting vibes.



My favourite thing was strolling along the canals, both in the soft and peaceful afternoon light and in the evening time, before and after dinner. The many canals have had the task of keeping the city above water. Also, the windows in the gorgeous apartments right by the canals are so huge that one gets a little glimpse of the local décor trends.


After a long walk what would better hit the spot than some gin? Let’s head toward the gin distillery Wynand Fockink (Pijlsteeg 31). It is a small tasting house established in 1679, serving jenever and liqueurs. There are guided tours with tastings during the weekends: a strong recommendation. We booked the tour online a few hours before it started and it was a fascinating experience. The host was superb, and we got to learn the stories behind many of the bottles: for example, there are drinks for all the phases of a love affair, from courtship to celebrating a new born baby.  In Dutch, by the way, pregnancy is referred to as Hansje in de Kelder. It is interesting to compare idioms in different languages.

The foodie in me rejoiced of the wide selection of Indonesian restaurants. A special recommendation goes to the rice table, Rijsttafel, at MAX Amsterdam (Herenstraat 14): the menu includes several Indonesian specialties, such as a spicy aubergine salad, a vegetable curry and seasoned seabass filet on a banana leaf. Yummy food in a warm atmosphere.

If you have time: visit De Hallen (Hannie Dankbaarpassage 47), a cultural concentration with a cinema, bike rental and repair store, fashion shops and a food market. The food hall offers flavours from dim sum to Lebanese and Vietnamese delicacies. The food was tasty and fresh but how the logistics were organized there could afford to be improved.

The last tip: the TSC Amsterdam Marathon. The route was scenic, the cheering was energetic and the weather in Mid-October was gorgeous with sunshine and around 25 degrees Celsius. There were even some families who had set up their own refuelling stands for the runners with bananas and water. And if you are not running and have a good three hours to yourself, head to the Van Gogh Museum. The doorman was arrogant, the masterpieces are purely impressive.