My Compact Kyoto Guide

I love to take a bunch of pictures when I travel: of everyday curiosities and details (such as Hello Kitty seat covers on the train and key chains with a plastic omelette and nigiri decorations attached to them), of delicious food items and epic views and sights, of course. And still, there were many moments and experiences in Kyoto which essence and ambience was tricky to capture in pictures, such as the mood of the soft late summer nights of the tropic by the Katsura river. Frogs were giving their loud croaking concert, young locals were sitting and chatting by the river banks and enjoying a beverage, a beer and life, while others were sharing a late dinner on the wooden terraces built above the riverside brooks, lit by rice paper lanterns.

Of course, not everything needs to be captured in digital snapshots, the mental mementos are super special as well. But now, from these reflections let’s dive into my more concrete Kyoto tips!

First, I must say, that before we visited Kyoto, I had an image in my mind that the place is enchantingly idyllic. A colleague of mine had praised the soothing onsens and a Japanese friend had described the classic tea ceremonies he truly enjoyed. So was it, idyllic? Well, yes and no. There are such picturesque historical temples and shrines, traditional quarters where you can spot geishas in beautiful attire and atmospheric ryokans and inviting tea rooms. But, the very centre of the city is made of concrete and for the best, beautiful and traditional parts of the city you need to go a bit further, though not far. Now, let’s see, where to go!

Kinkaku-ji, the Golden Pavilion


Now, be prepared to queue for a while to see this shining golden sight. This is described to be Kyoto’s most famous sight. And, it is impressive: the glittering gold pavilion shines in sunlight and is reflected in the pond surrounding it. I’d say that the temple is worth the visit, but you can plan other sights for the day as well, as this one is experienced rather quickly. We took the local bus there but then afterwards hopped into a taxi to get in time to the next sight (monkeys!). The temple is located in the far north west of Kyoto and is not close to the main train lines.


Fushimi Inari-Taisha



Fushimi Inari is a large and impressive shrine on Mount Inari, famous for its thousands of vermilion torii gates, which seem to go on endlessly. Inari is the Shinto god of rice and foxes are Inari’s messengers. Hence there are many fox statues wearing red scarfs which guard the shrines on the mountain. The hike to the summit takes around three hours, given that there a many other fellow travellers and that you’ll stop for photos and a refreshing water break several times. The large red torii gates along the path are donations, given either by companies or private individuals, and the name of the donor can be found on the side of the gate.

This sight & climb combo was unique and sweaty, definitely worth a day trip. The entrance is free. And though there was a sign warning us of boars roaming in the area, we encountered none, luckily, as my how to meet a boar skill set is a bit rusty.




Kiyomizu Temple by night



This temple area, situated in the eastern Higashiyama area, was especially spectacular during the late evening: the red temple buildings, the tall three-story pagoda and the colourful bell tower were shimmering in the summer night. I read that the Kiomizu-dera’s large wooden stage standing on high pillars was installed in a special way, without using a single nail but wooden joints instead. Check out the web page of the sight to catch the special light-up occasions.


Iwatayama Monkey Park and the Arashiyama Bamboo Grove

You can climb up to Mt Arashiyama (about 15 min ascent one way) and visit the home of around 120 Japanese macaque monkeys. You’ll see the monkeys for sure, no doubt about that. The monkeys roam freely there, in their natural surroundings. You’ll likely spot monkey toddlers playing with each other. You can feed the monkeys from the feeding cottage but avoid taking direct eye-contact because that would make the monkeys feel threatened. I liked that the monkeys could run and hop around freely on their own hill.

What else did I want to I suggest? First, the Nishiki Market, a narrow shopping street market with countless booths, shops and restaurants. At this lively and bustling place, you can feast with fresh seafood (or dried seafood, if you’d prefer) and delicious ramen and find for example juicy tofu, all kinds of matcha treats from smoothies to soft ice, cookware and fruit (which by the way were quite costly). A busy yet pleasant experience and a great place to grab for example an appetizer (octopus on a skewer) and a tasty lunch (I enjoyed a rich ramen soup) in one of the compact restaurants right by the market. And not to forget the steak and shrimp key chains purchase. I wonder who needs to have one of those, someone who really likes steak, I guess.

Another tip for especially all the foodies out there is an abundant and instagrammable Kaiseki dinner. Kaiseki is Japanese haute cuisine, a tasting menu consisting of many small and beautiful portions, presented in an elegant way. Our Kaiseki dinner included for example a miso soup, a portion of shredded mushrooms, fresh tuna, delicious fried salmon and as a dessert two tofu-like squares served on a stick. It definitely was an experience, memorable and visual, but maybe more interesting than epic in a culinary way.

All in all, Kyoto really delivered.

Snapshots from Kyoto, August 2019




Japan is very high up on my Explore the world bucket list. We spent one week in Kyoto in mid August. This wasn’t my first time in this fascinating country and hopefully it won’t be the last. Already dreaming of the next Japan adventure  either during the hanami or autumn colors.

When I travel, I just love to watch and observe people, details, city life, ways of interaction and how people are dressed. I’ll share some observations and notes on Kyoto. My selected edition of Kyoto tips will come out in the next post. All the pictures in this post are taken with my phone: snapshots from our explorations around Kyoto.

Kyoto is atmospheric, historic, traditional and pleasant, a big city with the vibes and special cosy mood of a small city. Kyoto is filled with gardens, temples, shrines and teahouses. Many of the streets in the centre are rather narrow and peaceful so biking and walking are very noteworthy options. And for daytrips for example to the Kinkaku-ji Golden pavilion you can take the bus: the bus network is comprehensive. When you do take the bus: step in from the middle door and pay the fare (with the exact amount of coins) when you leave the bus.



The soundscape of Kyoto was unique: The impressive sound of whistling bamboo trees at the Arashiyama bamboo grove. The croaking concert of frogs by the Kamo river in the dark and soft late summer evening of the subtropics. The loud chirring of cicadas. And the characteristic clatter of wooden sandals as a couple dressed in kimonos walked up the stone steps at the Fushimi Inari mountain.

August in Kyoto is h o t. About 35–37 degrees Celsius during the day. Not too hot but sweat running down your back and I wish we had one of those mini fans (with small ears as decorations (!) hot. Many of the locals were equipped for the day with a sweat towel around their necks. Many were also wearing these long separate sleeves (some had lace decorations in them) to protect themselves against the sun. I also learned that you can buy a cooling ice mask which will provide some chilling relief for your face. Restaurants and shops had excellent air conditioning and there’s a vending machine selling water, refreshments, ice coffee and matcha tea on almost every street corner, so you won’t get dehydrated, or decaffeinated.



What else did I want to tell you? The historic and busy Nishiki Market is a good place to enjoy a tasty snack, perhaps some grilled seafood (kaisanbutsu in Japanese), a piece of juicy tofu or maybe a cooling matcha ice cream, which tasted a lot like cold spinach soup and strangely enough was pretty addictive. There are plenty of kimono rental shops around the city so if you desire, you can get dressed up and have a photoshoot in one of the historical quarters. And, at the Inari mountain there was a sign that boars roam in the area, but luckily, we encountered none. But, we did see many lively monkeys at the Iwatayama Monkey Park, where they ran, played and climbed the trees at the top of the mountain.



New York State of Mind: My 5 NYC Tips

New York, New York: you are epic, thrilling, bustling, inspiring and exhausting. NY definitely is an iconic city and when you’re there it feels like you’re part of a bigger scene so very familiar from countless movies, series, novels and songs. In SATC NYC was  like the fifth major character in the series.

I want to share my best NY tips with you. Obviously, the list is not all-encompassing, but I hope that it can help you spice & shape your NYC experience with a few selected and tested gems.


Stay overnight in Jersey City


Definitely. Jersey City feels like an up and coming area with good vibes. With the price that we got a tiny (yet stylish) room in Midtown Manhattan, we got a beautiful spacious loft apartment in Jersey City. Jersey pampered us for example with a wide wooden pier which was perfect for sunny morning runs, a cute little coffee wagon where we got our post-run cappuccinos and almond croissants, a top-notch view to Southern Manhattan, a fast and affordable path train connection to Manhattan (20 minutes and $ 2,70), a farmers market and chilled vibes. When there, try also the Hudson Hall Smokehouse and beerhall (on 364 Marin Blvd): a tasty experience wrapped in yummy barbeque sauce and friendly and easy-going service.

Midtown Manhattan is busy and hectic and a good place to stay if you’ll for example take the train from the Penn Station the next morning (we went to Boston), but I really preferred to stay the other nights on the side of Jersey.


Feast in the Katz Delicatessen


Want to have the best pastrami sandwich of your life? The Katz Deli enjoys a legendary reputation and it was here where the famous scene in When Harry met Sally rom com was filmed. I’ll have what she’s having, indeed and yes please. There’s a sign hanging from the ceiling indicating where Meg Ryan’s character sat, pinpointing the exact seat for movie fans and tourists.

We shared the juicy Katz’s Pastrami Hot Sandwich and Katz’s Cheesesteak (the menu promised that this plentiful treat would make Rocky leave Philadelphia): both were purely delicious, tender and filling. The atmosphere in this Jewish-style deli is fast-paced, characteristic and interesting. You can opt for either the self-service way or the full-service seating: we did the latter and it worked well. The price was reasonable ($ 80 for two) considering it is New York and the sandwiches are shockingly yummy.

Address: 205 East Houston Street, corner of Ludlow St


Walk the High Line


High Line: calling it a green oasis might be a bit too much but it’s a verdant park-like public space built on an elevated freight rail line, located at the Meatpacking District in West Chelsea. On sunny days it is really popular. High Line is a nice green walk amid the bustling city. Before or after the day stroll you can visit the Chelsea Market (75 9th Ave) and for example enjoy Japanese inspired tacos for lunch.

See a Broadway show. See Chicago.

If you only have the chance, do this. A great place to get tickets up to 50 % off (to same-day performances) are the TKTS discount booths. We prefer the one on South Sea Seaport (located in the corner of Front and John Streets): there were no queues and we got tickets half price to Chicago of that same evening. There are two other booths as well, one on Times Square and the third at Lincoln Center.

And Chicago at the Ambassador Theatre (291 West 49th Street): it was mesmerizing, radiant and super skilled. The intermission drink from the theatre bar was way overpriced as you can expect but they served the sparkling wine in a big plastic mug with a straw so that you could keep sipping it during the second act. As a side note on how people in the audience is dressed: five years ago, in our first Broadway show I was slightly surprised how casually some people were dressed to the occasion. I remember seeing a bunch of shorts and t-shirts. But hey, then again, the main thing is the spectacular show.

Cross the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset


Cross the bridge to the side of Brooklyn, where you can admire the gleaming Manhattan skyline. Epic views are guaranteed. If you’re an early bird, go for the sunrise experience. We couldn’t help but wonder what it is like to live right next to the bridge where millions of people have a direct view to your living room, bedroom and life. Megacity life indeed.


What else, what else? Here are a few quick notes:

Visit the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1071 5th Ave). Afterwards you can enjoy a nice late lunch or light dinner at the atmospheric French bistro Demarchelier (50 East 86th Street).

Remember to apply for your ESTA before travelling to the States.

New York was way more expensive than five years ago. Back then we actually managed go under our NY travel budget (!) Many things can of course be affordable or free, but be prepared for high prices in food, accommodation, experiences and shopping of course.

And last, enjoy and take in the NYC magic with all your senses!