Postcards from Zermatt, the village with the chocolate mountain





There are five sounds that really belong to Zermatt and its verdant surroundings: the strong rumble of the river, the chirping of crickets, the hum of electric mini vans, the rustle of the silver-coloured paper of Toblerone packages and most importantly the joyous waus and aahs as the visitors and hikers finally see the mighty Matterhorn after the train ride from Täsch or Visp.



Ah, Zermatt, you are beautiful, a great base camp and starting point for countless hikes on the surrounding mountains, and really expensive. And I don’t just mean Switzerland expensive but an upscale touristic little village amid the mountains kind of expensive. The municipality of Zermatt is located in the canton of Valais. The undisputable star of the place is the majestic and beautiful Matterhorn. And I bet the mountain knows this: during our visit it often veiled its peak in fog and clouds and revealed all of its stunning beauty only on carefully chosen occasions. Luckily one of these moments was when we were enjoying the delicious and plentiful breakfast at the Hotel Ambiance before our hike of the day. But Matterhorn is not the only star on stage: there are altogether 38 four thousand-metre mountains in the area (!)


Zermatt is a great destination choice for those who love to hike (there is a 400 km network of hiking trails), mountain bike, enjoy the outdoors, breathe in the clean and crisp mountain air, marvel at the magnificent views and take a zillion photos. And if you’re looking for a luxury spa experience, you’ll very likely find that too, based on the number of spa hotels in the village.


A word about the hiking: it was no easy peasy light day stroll but really a proper workout with steep ascents in stony terrain. Add a clear blue sky, lovely sunrays, butterflies, the sight of chubby marmots, a piece of rich apple strudel and you will get hooked quicker than you can say One more piece of Toblerone please. I purely loved every minute of it. There’s something magical and purifying about being up in the heights, the sweat running down your back and your head being cleared from everything futile.


I’ll share my Zermatt favourites:

The relaxing heat of the sauna after a long and physical hiking day and sliding into the jacuzzi on the terrace with Matterhorn standing in the background. Bless the nice young lady at the reception who prepared this for us. Warm thoughts to her and the experience.

The gorgeous panoramic hike to Riffelsee: the hike itself was beautiful and it culminated in seeing the reflection of Matterhorn from the mountain lake and of course in taking the must-do chocolate-mountain top photos (a few practice shots were needed here). Indeed, the famous chocolate bar has received it’s shape from the majestic mountain. About the hiking routes: take a compact route map with you either from your accommodation or the tourist info. The routes and their difficulty levels are marked there. The signs along the routes were not as clear as I would have expected, so it’s good to have the map as well.


The luscious piece of Italy in Zermatt: the restaurant Chalet da Giuseppe (Vispastrasse 26, Zermatt 3920). Fireworks for the palate. Try the creamy burrata, the rich truffle soup and nonna’s ravioli. An extra mentioning goes to the warm atmosphere and the singing owner. Note: the door is quite heavy, so pull hard enough. Whatever you do, don’t walk away from this Italian taste adventure.


The hike to and across the Charles Kuonen Suspension Bridge, the longest pedestrian suspension bridge in the world. The length of the bridge is 500 metres and it hangs 85 metres above the ground. It was a thrill and there’s no way I could have pulled out my camera when I was half way through it. Luckily the other one of us was more daring. The hike is a circular tour which starts from the village of Randa and takes a bit less than 3 hours. An adrenaline rush guaranteed.

The most delicious hit-the-spot pitstop including a club sandwich and a glass of prosecco (and Zermatt Bier for Mr. O) at the sun terrace of the Bar 2’222 m at the Riffelalp resort.

And as the final point, waking up one morning, opening the balcony door and discovering that this hazy mist had covered the village. It was almost like stepping into a cloud: foggy and a bit surreal.

Zermatt is a gorgeous nature paradise for hiking lovers, a strong suggestion. A happy place.

Christmas Vibes under the Andalucían Sun



One of the best things on our Christmas holiday in the South of Spain? Light. Light. Light. Sunlight. Sunrays. After a long period of moist darkness in Finland, my every cell was yearning for solar energy. And that’s exactly what we got. Plus, a bunch of unforgettable experiences.

We spent the yuletide in Andalucía. We flew to Malaga and spent the first half of our vacation at Costa del Sol and did day trips to Marbella, Malaga and Ronda. The second half we spent in historic Córdoba, the city with the mesmerizing Mezquita mosque. It has become almost a tradition for us to spend Christmas abroad. Not to escape Xmas, but rather to make the most of the holiday season and to spice it with a bit of adventure. We’ve had Christmas treats made from various internal organs in Guangzhou, hiked to a mountain with the giant bronze Buddha statue in Hong Kong and bathed in sunlight in Lisbon while enjoying the rich pasteis de nata pastries. And now South of Spain.

Must admit, I was just a little bit doubtful whether the easy and comfortable Costa del Sol life was for me, with the all-day British breakfasts and generous cocktail offers. But what really made me fall for multi-layered Andalucía was the incredible versatility.

Here are some of the memories that are most vivid in my mind right now: Having delicious white fish for lunch in a chiringuito on the beach in December, wearing summery clothing (!). By the way, one popular local treat is a sardine espeto (skewer), warm and fresh straight from the grill.

Torremolinos

Patio de los Naranjos, the Mezquita, Córdoba

Taking countless pictures of tall palm trees (the new Christmas tree) and of orange trees which were ubiquitous. And listening to the mighty waves hit the shore on the beach promenade in Torremolinos when heading back from dinner.

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Malaga

Doing an evening stroll in Puerto Banus in Marbella, the Monaco of Southern Spain, admiring the big boats and yachts and marvelling at the imaginative and everything-but-affordable costumes the small dogs were dressed in.

Port in Benalmadena

The beautiful city of gorges, Ronda

Sipping delicious warm mint tea in an atmospheric tetería in Córdoba. And admiring the many atmospheric patios and inner courtyards of the city, with fountains, decorated balconies, the blooming poinsettia and cobblestoned floorings. For patio-afecionados like myself, in early May in Córdoba there is a festival Fiesta de los Patios de Córdoba: in this “best patio” competition many of the beautiful patios are opened for the public and flamenco is played on various plazas around the city. By the way, Córdoba is among those cities in Spain in which I could happily see myself living, in addition to Bilbao, Oviedo and Madrid, without forgetting the little cava village Sant Sadurní d’Anoia.

The exterior of the Mezquita, Córdoba


Back to Andalucía recollections. The food, the tapas, the wine and the dry sherry. The grilled chicken we got for lunch from the chicken kiosk Asador, El pollo dorado in Benalmadena Pueblo. The rich salmorejo (a puree made of tomatoes and bread), the oxtail, the morcilla black sausage and the various delicious treats of the sea, from navajas to different tasty types of white fish. Interestingly, we found many counterparts from the Spanish cuisine to traditional Finnish Christmas foods: Jamón ibérico for those who want to have their Christmas pork, arroz con leche – a sweet rice pudding (in Finland we have porridge), enjoyed cold. And Pedro Ximénez, a sweet and dark desert wine, a bit like the remote cousin of the Finnish rusinasoppa, raisin soup, which we enjoy with the rice porridge.


We got to see a lot, but so much remains to be explored: the Alhambra palace area in Granada with its vibes from the tales of One Thousand and One Nights, discovering Sevilla more thoroughly and perhaps a skiing holiday at the peaks of Sierra Nevada. Maybe next Xmas. Hasta la próxima.

Trento, the Gem of Northern Italy


We know Milan, Venice, Verona and the beautiful and popular lake region. But now it’s time to look up north, to Südtirol: there by the Adige River lies a culinary, bubbly, architectural and historical concentration called Trento. This city mixes influences and vibes from both Italy and Austria. On our first night there it took me a bit of time to get used to the imposing dark shapes behind the Adige river – the mountains that guard the city. Hop on the Trento tour and decide for yourself whether to include this Trentino delight on your travel plan next summer!

So, what are the highlights of Trento? First, location, location and location. Trento is located 224 kilometres northeast of Milan and less than an hour car ride from Riva del Garda, the northern tip of Lake Garda. Many roads lead from Trento: whether you are into hiking, skiing, mountain biking or winery hopping, Trento’s vicinities and neighbouring areas offer countless possibilities. For example: the city of Merano and the mountain hiker’s dream peak Merano 2000 are less than an hour’s car ride away. Secondly, 70 kilometres from Trento begins the Alto Adige Wein Strasse where you can get acquainted with local grape varieties with all your senses.

The city of Bolzano, with its numerous tower houses is a good day trip destination.

Culinarism. Would you have guessed that Trento is a culinary hotspot? Well, on the other hand, we are in Italy, the land of culinary pleasures, where many of the best restaurants have their own risotto chefs (such a noble profession, by the way). But yes, be prepared to dine well in Trento. A few recommendations: Scrigno del Duomo at the Piazza del Duomo: their Gorgonzola risotto mesmerized me; Osteria Il Cappello (Piazzetta Bruno Lunelli 5): an elegant and cosy restaurant with an atmospheric terrace: their burrata is purely divine and I am not exaggerating here. Also, in Trento you can find many beer halls with garden terraces which serve delicious food for late diners like us. And, must not forget, our favourite lunch spot was Dal Marcante Specialitá Alimentari at Viale Adriano Olivetti: they serve a wide selection of local cheeses, salamis and wines. Local, fresh and delicious and a special thanks to the warm service.


Pair excellent food with first class wine. Let’s pop in at the Ferrari winery (Via del Ponte, 15). We had booked a tour and a tasting at Ferrari Trento in advance. The tour started with a 15-minute ad film about the winery (skilled but rather sentimental), its history and the owning family, followed by the tour and the tasting. The story and legend of the Ferrari winery began with a man called Giulio Ferrari in the beginning of 1900s. He had a vision and a passion of creating a wine which could compete with the high-quality French Champagnes. Ferrari himself did not have offspring so later he chose, after careful consideration, a wine shop keeper from Trento called Bruno Lunelli, to continue fulfilling his dream and vision of producing quality sparkling wine in the heart of Trentino. And now today, the third generation of the Lunelli family is leading the company. I propose we raise a virtual glass to Giulio, who once decided to plant Chardonnay in Italian soil and was persistent with his pioneering experiments. Salute!



Since a good holiday is about balance, it’s time to go for a run (perhaps on the following day of the winery visit). Up on the hill Doss Trento there is the Mausoleo di Cesare Battisti and running there and back from the city centre makes for an excellent morning workout. You’ll get a bird’s perspective on the city, a sweaty workout and some culture all in one, which is convenient. Next to this hill lies the a mountain, best reached by the Funivia (funicular) Trento-Sardagna. The latter is a pretty little village with several small vineyard patches.

If you happen to visit the place on a calm Sunday afternoon, everything except the bar/café by the cable car station will be closed but you can enjoy some refreshing cold water from the several water posts and admire at the illustrations on the facades of the houses. And after this healthy day walk, if you desire you can enjoy a glass of cold and sparkling Altemasi Trentodoc at the bistrot before heading back down.






What else? The MUSE, the Science Museum designed by the architect Renzo Piano (Corso del Lavoro e della Scienza 3) hosts many interactive exhibitions. Very popular with families and children and no wonder as there is a big experiential area for kids. Also, wandering on the streets and alleys of the city centre and admiring the many beautiful balconies, wooden window shutters and balcony flower blossom. My each trip to Italy equals tens if not hundreds of pictures of the aforementioned.


Grazie Trento, you were a sweet mixture of bubbles, Piazzas, historical vibes and the intoxicating scent of apple orchards.